Difficulties with fishery policies

The CFP faces a great many difficulties and is by no means a fully effective system. Disputes between member states are common and at times can even lead to violence. Politicians and scientists are often in disagreement particularly concerning TACs and such aspects as discards and bycatch. Nevertheless, despite these difficulties a degree of accord has been reached on aspects such as minimum mesh and landing sizes, closed areas and seasons for certain fisheries, and regulations on size and use of particular types of fishing gear, notably beam trawls, in certain areas. It is the responsibility of each coastal state to supervise and enforce the regulations within its own fishery zone, but the degree of enforcement certainly varies between states.

The problems of framing beneficial fishery policies are made more difficult by the far-reaching effects of fishery regulations, often involving many people not directly employed in fishing. If fishing is reduced by cutting down the number of boats, fishermen are put out of work. Unemployment among fishermen has severe social consequences for local communities where fishing is a traditional way of life. More jobs are also lost in associated occupations, such as in shipbuilding, especially in small yards, in fishing gear manufacture and in enterprises involved in handling, processing and marketing fish. There are probably at least five shore jobs dependent on each fisherman's employment.

However, if fewer boats put to sea, those fortunate enough to remain fishing are likely to make larger catches; and if the total quantity of fish landed is less, the price of fish may rise and profits for some may be greater. If national quotas are allocated, it may well be more profitable to take the permitted catch with a few boats and very large nets than with many smaller boats using less effective gear.

There are consequently many interests to be kept in mind in formulating fishery

Figure 9.37 The European Community's waters showing ICES blocks.

(Reproduced by permission of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.)

Figure 9.37 The European Community's waters showing ICES blocks.

(Reproduced by permission of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.)

policy. The public needs a good supply of fish at reasonable prices. The industry needs to be assured of fair profit. There are some communities for whom fishing is a heritage which should be protected even though it may be done in ways which are less profitable than those which modern technology can offer. None of these interests can in the long term be safeguarded without rational conservation of the fish stocks on which they depend.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Boating Secrets Uncovered

Boating Secrets Uncovered

If you're wanting to learn about boating. Then this may be the most important letter you'll ever read! You Are Going To Get An In-Depth Look At One Of The Most Remarkable Boating Guides There Is Available On The Market Today. It doesn't matter if you are just for the first time looking into going boating, this boating guide will get you on the right track to a fun filled experience.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment