International Relations and Climate Change

Viewed as an exercise in international regime building, the life of the UNFCCC and the Kyoto Protocol reflects logic more than experience. The theoretical vision encompasses three beliefs Rational policy planning and institutional design can be smoothly extended from national to multilateral, even global, levels. Regimes should be inclusive to forestall free riding and to increase the potential for productive trading. Regime rules and sanctions can be enforced multilaterally, as in any national...

Notes On Kyoto Protocol

Jyoti Parikh and Jyoti Prasad Painuly, Population, Consumption Patterns and Global Warming, AMBIO 23, no. 7 (1994). 2. Gustav Speth, Global Warming Looking beyond Kyoto, talk given at Yale Center for the Study of Globalization, Yale University, October 21, 2005. 3. Jyoti Parikh and B. K. Chandra Kiran, Economic Impact of Carbon Emission Restrictions The Case of India, in Energy Security, Climate Change, and Sustainable Development, edited by J. Mathur, H. Wagner, and N. Bansal (New Delhi...

Alexander golub

Russia is an important player in the international effort to address climate change. Its share in global carbon dioxide CO2 emissions declined from about 11 percent in 1990 to about 6.4 percent in 2003.1 Despite the sharp decline, Russia remains among the world's largest polluters, ranking third in the world after the United States and China and before Japan and India. This chapter presents the history of Russian climate policy since the Kyoto Protocol was adopted at Conference of the Parties...

Mitigation Adaptation and a Way Forward

The problem of climate change poses challenging issues to almost all countries, and India is no exception. Along with global problems like ocean pollution and species extinction, and local problems such as pollution of air and water as well as the degradation of soil and forests, the problem of climate change has to be addressed in the context of sustainable development. Development activities and poverty alleviation programs also increase emissions of greenhouse gases GHGs . The 1992 United...

Info

Anthropogenic Climate Change Revisiting the Facts The idea that humans can change and are in fact changing the climate of our planet has developed gradually over more than a hundred years. A fringe idea in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries,1 it is close to a well-established scientific consensus at the turn of the twenty-first century.2 The history of this development is grippingly told in a small book, The Discovery of Global Warming, by science historian Spencer Weart.3 During the...