California Electronic Waste Recycling

The California legislature passed the Electronic Waste Recycling Act of 2003 to address the growing problem of e-waste from computer and television video display devices. The act requires that an e-waste fee be collected at the time the product is sold to help pay for the safe recycling of what the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) has determined to be "covered electronic devices" or CEDs. CEDs are defined as display devices that measure more than 4 inches diagonally. These include new or refurbished:

▲ Televisions that use a CRT or LCD for display.

▲ Plasma televisions.

▲ Computer monitors that are either CRT or LCD.

▲ Any other products that contain a CRT.

▲ Laptop computers.

▲ Portable DVD players that have an LCD display.

Several types of products with video displays are exempt from the Act and not subject to an e-waste fee. These include:

▲ Displays that are part of a motor vehicle or a part of any industrial, commercial, or medical equipment.

▲ Displays that are part of household appliances, such as refrigerators, microwaves, ovens, air conditioners, washers and dryers, and so on.

▲ Items that are used and not refurbished.

The fee ranges from $6 to $10 per each CED sold and is based on the size of the screen, measured diagonally. Screens between 4 inches and 15 inches incur a $6 fee; screens larger than 15 inches up to 35 inches incur a $8 fee; and screens 35 inches and larger incur a $10 fee.

An interesting provision of the California law specifically mentions the e-waste laws passed by the European Union by noting that the California Department of Toxic Substance Control "shall adopt regulations, in accordance with this section, that prohibit an electronic device from being sold or offered for sale in this state if the electronic device is prohibited from being sold or offered for sale in the European Union."

MAINE'S HOUSEHOLD TELEVISION AND COMPUTER MONITOR RECYCLING LAW

In 2003, a comprehensive e-waste law was passed in Maine to create a partnership among local and state governments, the manufacturers of electronic equipment, and consumers to ensure that all e-waste is recycled or properly disposed of. The legislature wrote that "the purpose of this section is to establish a comprehensive electronics recycling system that ensures the safe and environmentally sound handling, recycling and disposal of electronic products and components and encourages the design of electronic products and components that are less toxic and more recyclable."

The law requires that local governments establish a system for their residents to use to ensure that residential e-waste gets to an approved consolidation facility. The local government can operate its own collection center, have special collection days, or have their residents deliver the e-waste directly to a near-by consolidator.

State

Effective

Year Affected Products

Arkansas 2008 Computer and electronic equipment

California 2002/2006 CRTs in 2002; all electronic devices in 2006

Connecticut 2011 TVs, monitors, personal computers, laptops

Maine

2010 TVs, monitors, personal computers, laptops

2006 Any item containing a CRT

Maryland 2006 TVs, monitors, personal computers.

Ends 2010 laptops

Massachusetts 2000 CRTs

Minnesota 2006 CRTs

Missouri

2009

Computer equipment: computers, monitors, laptops, keyboards, mice; does NOT apply to televisions.

Who Pays Notes

Legislation

Affects only state-owned equipment.

CRTs are treated as hazardous waste, which makes them ineligible to be sent to normal landfills. Ties regulations to EU RoHS Directive.

Law permits OEMs to establish their own program, but they cannot opt out of the state program.

OEMs pay their proportionate share of orphan waste

Uses a consolidation point model. E-waste collected at municipal sites is taken to consolidation points.

OEMs pay a flat fee into a recycling fund.

CRTs prohibited from all solid waster disposal facilities; state-supported recycling.

Ties regulations to EU RoHS Directive.

Requires OEMs to set up recycling programs.

HB 2115

Electronic Waste Recycling Act of 2003

Public Act 07-189

SB 2313

Household Television and Computer Monitor Recycling Law

Statewide Computer Recycling Pilot Program Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection regulation 115A.9565 Cathode-Ray

Tube Prohibition SB 720

Montana 2007 Video, audio, telecommunication equipment, computers, and household appliances New Jersey 2010 Covered electronic devices

New Hampshire 2007 CRTs greater than 4 inches.

North Carolina 2009 Oklahoma 2009

Oregon 2010

Rhode Island 2008

monitors largerthan 4 i

Computer equipment: computers, monitors, laptops, keyboards, mice; does NOT apply to televisions.

Computer equipment: computers, monitors, laptops; does NOT apply to televisions.

Desktop computer, laptop, TVs and monitors largerthan 4 inches.

Desktop computer, laptop, TVs and ches.

Texas 2008 Computer equipment: computers, monitors, laptops, keyboards, mice; does NOT apply to televisions. Washington 2009 TVs, monitors, personal computers, laptops

State/ Consumer

State

OEM OEM

Figure 2-1

U.S. STATE ELECTRONICS RECYCLING/REUSE LEGISLATION.

Establishes a public education program for household hazardous waste recycling.

Requires OEMs to set up recycling programs.

The state department of environmental services monitors the disposal of electronic waste.

Requires OEMs to set up recycling programs.

Requires OEMs to set up recycling programs.

OEMs can set up their own recycling plan or join the state's plan.

OEMs can set up their own recycling plan or join the state's plan.

Requires OEMs to set up recycling programs.

HB 555 Public Education Program.

Electronic Waste Recycling Act HB 1455

Solid Waste

Management Act 2007 SB 1631

HB 2626

Electronic Waste Prevention, Reuse And Recycling Act Electronic Waste Recycling Act

Requires OEMs to set up recycling SB 6428 programs.

Each manufacturer that sells computers and electronics in Maine is responsible for paying the consolidators for the cost of handling, transporting, and recycling their products, as well as for their share of the costs for products from manufacturers that no longer sell products in the state. They must also provide annual reports to the Maine Department of Environmental Protection on the recycling of their products in the state.

The consolidation facilities are responsible for tracking the e-waste delivered to them by manufacturers and report these numbers to the Maine Department of Environmental Protection. They are also only allowed to ship e-waste to recyclers that are certified to meet the "Environmentally Sound Management Guidelines" developed by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection. The recyclers are then responsible for giving the consolidators a sworn statement that they met these guidelines.

Finally, retailers in Maine can only sell products from manufacturers that have been certified to meet e-waste handling laws. The state maintains a list of approved and unapproved manufacturers and brands on its Web site.

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