SWOT Analysis

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My friend Nathan Good, an award-winning green architect in Salem, Oregon likes to use a SWOT analysis for his visioning sessions, using a diagram much like the one shown in Fig. 4.2. Borrowed from the world of the MBA school and from management

*FM Link [online], http://www.fmlink.com/ProfResources/Sustainability/Articles/article.cgi?USGBC:200703-19.html, accessed April 2008.

^Interview with Dan Heinfeld, LPA, Inc., February 2008.

Green Building Design Teams

Figure 4.1 (Left to right) John Nystedt, Muscoe Martin, Colin Franklin, Tony Aiello, and Bert Westcott, design team members of the Morris Arboretum project.

Photography by Paul W. Meyer of the Morris Arboretum, University of Pennsylvania.

Figure 4.1 (Left to right) John Nystedt, Muscoe Martin, Colin Franklin, Tony Aiello, and Bert Westcott, design team members of the Morris Arboretum project.

Photography by Paul W. Meyer of the Morris Arboretum, University of Pennsylvania.

Swot Design
Figure 4.2 Vision-SWOT-Action describes a process for charrette facilitation that engages participants and generates a long list of design issues and tentative project decisions.

consulting, the SWOT analysis combines a candid discussion of the following four elements with a future vision, to arrive at an action agenda for the project. The SWOT analysis can be used to uncover opportunities, such as external funding for energy efficiency upgrades, things that might fall outside of any individual discipline's particular responsibilities. It provides a convenient way to create a bridge from the present situation to a desired future outcome.

■ Strengths—internal to the project; these can be particular design talents, owner resources, and the like.

■ Weaknesses—internal to the project; things that can inhibit sustainable design, such as disagreements over goals, lack of resources to pay for energy efficiency upgrades, and so on.

■ Opportunities—external to the project; these can be natural resources (solar, wind, etc.), financial incentives for green buildings; partners willing to invest in the project, and the like.

■ Threats—external to the project; these can include anything that would threaten the success of the design process, such as a change in ownership or local laws that do not allow graywater systems.

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Renewable Energy 101

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable. The usage of renewable energy sources is very important when considering the sustainability of the existing energy usage of the world. While there is currently an abundance of non-renewable energy sources, such as nuclear fuels, these energy sources are depleting. In addition to being a non-renewable supply, the non-renewable energy sources release emissions into the air, which has an adverse effect on the environment.

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Responses

  • cohen
    How to do swot analysis forarboretum?
    9 years ago

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