Conclusion

Power Efficiency Guide

Ultimate Guide to Power Efficiency

Get Instant Access

This book has suggested a number of ways in which non-state actors are important to explanations of the international community's response to the threat of global climate change. The empirical story sketched above only provides a snapshot of the current landscape of NGO activity in global climate politics, and future changes will need to be continually documented. This is especially important in an area of politics so subject to flux and conflict as global warming; power relations will transform and realign as circumstances change.

There is some indication that the regime thinkers who currently dominate the discourse on international environmental politics, recognise the necessity of future research into non-state actors. As Young and Von Moltke (1994:361-2) argue, 'it is critical to deepen our concerns for the pervasive role of non-state actors as players in the processes of regime creation, implementation and operation of regimes. . . . No issue-area constitutes a better laboratory in which to study these developments than international environmental affairs.' It is hoped, then, that this book has been able to demonstrate, not just that the existing approaches to explaining global climate politics provide an incomplete representation of the political relations that surround

8 For Cox (1987:105) the principal characteristics of state forms are defined by the characteristics of their historical blocs, that is, 'the configurations of social forces upon which state power ultimately rests. A particular configuration of social forces defines in practice the limits or parameters of state purposes'.

this complex issue area, but that most of the approaches outlined may constitute the foundations of an alternative framework for thinking about the importance of non-state actors in global environmental politics. At minimum they suggest a bridge from the predominantly state-based literature to a wider account of transnational world politics, in which the importance of non-state actors is better represented.

APPENDIX A

List of abbreviations

ABARE

Australian Bureau of Agriculture and Resource Economics

AGBM

Ad Hoc Group on the Berlin Mandate

AGGG

Advisory Group on Greenhouse Gases

AIJ

Activities implemented jointly

AIM

Accuracy in the Media

ALTENER

Programme for the promotion of renewable energy

sources (EU)

AOSIS

Alliance of Small Island States

APPEA

Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association

BBC

British Broadcasting Corporation

BCAS

Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies

BCSD

Business Council for Sustainable Development

BDI

Bundesverband der Deutschen Industrie

BRF

British Roads Federation

BTU

British thermal unit

CAFE

Corporate average fuel efficiency standards

CAN

Climate Action Network

CANLA

Climate Action Network Latin America

CANSA

Climate Action Network South Asia

CANSEA

Climate Action Network South East Asia

CASA

Citizen's Alliance for Saving the Atmosphere and Earth

CBI

Confederation ofBritish Industry

CDM

Clean Development Mechanism

CEA

Council of Economic Advisors (US)

CFC

Chlorofluorocarbon

CNA

Climate Network Africa

CNE

Climate Network Europe

CO2

Carbon dioxide

COP

Conference of the Parties

CSE

Centre for Science and Environment (India)

DoE

Department of Energy (US)

DoT

Department of Transport

DTI

Department of Trade and Industry

EBCSEF

European Business Council for a Sustainable Energy Future

EC

European Community

ECJ

European Court of Justice

ECOSOC Economic and Social Council (UN)

ECSC European Coal and Steel Community

EDF Environmental Defense Fund

ENDA Environment and Development Third World

EPA Environmental Protection Agency

ERT European Roundtable of Industrialists

EU European Union

EUROACE European Association for the Conservation of Energy

EUROPIA European Petroleum Industry Association

FCCC Framework Convention on Climate Change

FIELD Foundation for International Environmental Law and

Development

FoE Friends of the Earth

FoEI Friends of the Earth International

GCC Global Climate Coalition

GCI Global Commons Institute

GCMs General circulation models

GEF Global Environmental Facility

GLOBE Global Legislators for a Balanced Environment

GNP Gross national product

G7 The seven most industrialised countries in the world

G77 The group of seventy-seven less developed countries

HFC Hydrofluorocarbons

ICC International Chamber of Commerce

ICCP International Climate Change Partnership

ICSU International Council of Scientific Unions

IEA International Energy Agency

IFIEC International Federation of Industrial Energy Consumers

IGBP International Geo -Biosphere Programme

INC(CC) Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee on Climate Change

INGO International non-governmental organisation

IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

IR International relations

IUCN International Union for the Conservation of Nature

JI Joint implementation

JOULE Programme on Joint Opportunities for Unconventional or

Long-term Energies

JUSCANZ Negotiating bloc made up of Japan, New Zealand, Australia and the United States

LDCs Less developed countries

MOEF Ministry of Environment and Forests (India)

MITI Ministry of International Trade and Industry (Japan)

NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration

NCA National Coal Association

NGO

Non-governmental organisation

NIEO

New International Economic Order

NRDC

Natural Resources Defense Council

OECD

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development

OMB

Office ofManagement and Budget

OPEC

Organisation ofPetroleum Exporting Countries

PAC

Political Action Committee

PAMs

Policies and measures

PFCs

Perfluorocarbons

QELROs

Quantifiable emission limitation and reduction objectives

SAR

Second Assessment Report of the IPCC

SAVE

Specific Actions for Vigorous Energy Efficiency

SBI

Subsidiary Body on Implementation

SBSTA

Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice

SEI

Stockholm Environment Institute

SF6

Sulphur hexafluoride

SMMT

Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders

SWCC

Second World Climate Conference

TERI

Tata Energy Research Institute

THERMIE

EnergyTechnology Support Programme

UK

United Kingdom

UN

United Nations

UNCED

United Nations Conference on Environment and

Development

UNCTAD

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

UNECE

United Nations Economic Commission on Europe

UNEP

United Nations Environment Programme

UNESCO

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural

Organisation

UNFCCC

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

UNGA

United Nations General Assembly

UNICE

Union of Industrial Employers' Confederations in Europe

UPI

Italian Oil Board

US

United States of America

WBCSD

World Business Council for Sustainable Development

WCI

World Coal Institute

WCRP

World Climate Research Programme

WEC

World Energy Council

WG

Working Group (of the IPCC)

WICE

World Industry Council for the Environment

WMO

World Meterological Organisation

WRI

World Resources Institute

WWF

World Wide Fund for Nature/World Wildlife Fund (US)

WWFI

World Wide Fund for Nature International

APPENDIX B

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Guide to Alternative Fuels

Guide to Alternative Fuels

Your Alternative Fuel Solution for Saving Money, Reducing Oil Dependency, and Helping the Planet. Ethanol is an alternative to gasoline. The use of ethanol has been demonstrated to reduce greenhouse emissions slightly as compared to gasoline. Through this ebook, you are going to learn what you will need to know why choosing an alternative fuel may benefit you and your future.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment