Mobile and static clinics

Vaccination can be from static and/or mobile clinics. Their various advantages and disadvantages are given in the following table:

Static

Mobile

Coverage

Limited to 10 km

Large areas

radius

Availability

Always

Occasional

Transport

Not required

Required

Costs

High capital, low

Moderate

recurrent costs

capital, high

recurrent costs

Vaccine

Often erratic

Good

supplies

A static clinic responsible for providing primary care services (including delivery) for both the mother and the child is the most effective. A child stands a greater chance of receiving all its vaccines from a static health unit. However, as distance from the clinic increases, the probability of a mother bringing her child to the clinic decreases for every kilometer to be walked. Coverage is best closest to the clinic and decreases further away, with often large gaps between clinics as shown in Fig. 3.2. It is in the inadequately covered areas between the static clinics that an epidemic is likely to occur. Outreach services or mobile clinics then become valuable in vaccinating the in-between areas. For the economics of static and mobile vaccination clinics, see Section 1.5.1.

Mobile clinics are easier to organize where only one dose of vaccine is required (e.g. measles) and have a special place in mass campaigns.

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