Notes

References to pages in Time, Newsweek, and U.S. News & World Report refer to the International Edition. Page numbers may be different in the edition for readers in the United States. 1. Bottled Water. The Ecologist, February 2003, p. 46. 2. EPA Says U.S. Economy Depends on Clean Water, CNN.com citation to Nature, June 9, 2000. 3. Liquidating Our Assets. World-Watch, September-October 1997, p. 39. 4. S. Postel, Last Oasts (New York Norton, 1992), 103. 5. N. L. Tomer, Water Conservation Makes...

Bioenergy

Bioenergy is energy contained in natural biological materials such as plants and animal waste. Plants replenish themselves and animals never stop producing waste, so that biomass is inexhaustable. It includes forests, grass, straw, cut wood, waste paper, agricultural plant residue such as corn husks and cobs, manure, and gases and liquids obtained from these sources. If biomass is already dead, burning it simply speeds up the natural decay of dead plants, which is environmentally benign....

Water Prices

There are more than 200,000 public water systems in the United States, and Americans greatly underpay in all of them for the water they use. The unrealistically low cost of public water supplies is a serious impediment to water conservation. An average urban family uses about 12,000 gallons per month, costing only about 25. At this ridiculously low price we can refill an 8-ounce glass of water with tap water 2,500 times for less than the cost of a can of soda. At such a low price for municipal...

Home

About 19 percent of the nation's water use is in the home, so that part of the reason for our diminishing water supply lies in increased cleanliness and the nearly universal access Americans have to modern plumbing. In 1900 less than one in five homes had running water today nearly all homes do. Three-quarters of the water you use at home you use in the bathroom, mostly for showers and toilet flushing (figure 1.5). Showers In 1900 Americans bathed or showered only once or twice a week (or less...

Water Is There Enough and Is It Drinkable

Some till the soil, a few are kings John L. Ford, Water and Wastewater Engineering Few of us think regularly about water. It seems limitless because it falls from the sky year after year. We turn on the tap and fresh, pure water comes out. Most of us have never known it to be otherwise. But problems that water specialists saw on the horizon many decades ago are now with us. Water shortages are a well-known problem not only in desert areas such as Tucson, Phoenix, Las Vegas, and Albuquerque but...

Additional Readings

References to pages in Time, Newsweek, and U.S. News amp World Report refer to the International Edition. Page numbers may be different in the edition for readers in the United States. For a guide to worldwide environmental organizations, see the 2003 Conservation Directory compiled by the National Wildlife Federation and published by Island Press, Washington, D.C. Greenberg, M. R. Is Public Support for Environmental Protection Decreasing An Analysis of U.S. and New Jersey Data. Environmental...

Global Warming and Human Health

It is clear that small changes in the past 10,000 years have had very large ecological effects and they can happen bloody fast. Reid A. Bryson, Wall Street Journal Within the past few years there have been a spate of scary headlines suggesting that a warmer climate may lead to epidemics of malaria, cholera, yellow fever, and other maladies. Typical headline Report says global warming poses threat to public health. Another says Should we fear a global plague Yes disease is the deadliest threat...