Factory Manager

Policy:

The policy of this organization is to introduce a new Energy and Environmental Management System project to make further energy and environmental performance improvements, in addition to the significant progress made in the past. By implementing the new Energy and Environmental Management System, we aim:

• to cut energy costs and improve profits

• to improve cost-effectiveness, productivity and working conditions

• to protect the environment

Target:

To define implementation programs in order to save 1O% of the 1999 production costs over next three years by optimizing existing facilities and implementing an Energy and Environmental Management System (EEMS) which utilizes the skills of the factory staff in order to establish the best practical operation for maintaining the long-term performance improvement gains.

Period:

1st year -March-December 2OOO 2nd year - January-December 2OO1 3rd year - January-December 2OO2

Key success factors:

1. We have to avoid unnecessary expenditures by the 3Rs - Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

2. We have to improve cost- effectiveness, productivity and working conditions.

3. We have to be convinced that the target can be achieved.

4. We should have a sense of duty and responsibility in order to promote the energy and environmental performance improvements.

5. We are to achieve the improved profitability b ythe efforts of the entire company.

We should always keep our above commitments in mind and, always with a positive attitude.

Chief Executive Officer

Defining objectives, setting performance targets, assigning responsibilities, measuring achievements over time and establishing a regular reporting and reviewing system within the management structure are essential steps in converting a performance improvement policy from a raw concept into a detailed plan and ultimately into results.

5.3.2 Assigning Management Responsibilities for Energy and Environment

The responsibilities for energy and environmental management are assigned to the entire management structure, as described earlier (Part I Chapter 1):

(i) top management team;

(ii) operational team(s);

ECC teams will be given individual targets for energy and environmental performance. The achievement of overall performance or profitability improvement is the task of the operational team(s), while the top management team should facilitate and support the continuous improvement process so that it gradually becomes a standard operational routine.

An important task is to assign leadership responsibility for energy and environmental matters to dedicated person(s) - energy and environmental manager (EE manager). He or she should be a driving force behind the implementation of EEMS and a champion of change. Because the EE manager crosses the functional boundaries of a company, he or she should also be a repository of knowledge. Internally, the EE manager should know what the company knows about EE issues and externally he or she should know what issues the company should be aware of.

The common basic duties for an energy and environmental manager are:

• promote and support improvement of energy and environmental performance;

• verify performance information regularly and prepare it for internal and external purposes;

• supervise handling, interpretation, reporting and record keeping of performance data;

• verify the results of corrective actions and the achievement of targets and plans;

• provide technical support for ECC leaders and operators if required;

• periodically inspect the adequacy of performance measurement systems;

• reset targets when required.

The specific responsibilities of the EE manager do not release line management from their performance responsibilities and the operational requirements of the EEMS. For example, line managers may be delegated responsibility for detailing the operating procedures which their operational staff must follow and to upgrade and document them into the best operational practice.

5.3.3 EEMS Organization

For EEMS to be effective, individual roles and responsibilities must be clearly defined, including how they relate to the achievement of energy and environmental objectives and targets and to the overall operation of the EEMS. Holding people accountable for specified results is another critical point on the path to success.

The organizational structure should be defined in writing. An organizational chart will be helpful for illustrating the energy and environmental responsibilities that must be addressed. The organizational structure and responsibilities should involve all relevant functions and all levels throughout the organization. All the employees of the organization should clearly understand their energy and environmental performance related roles and responsibilities, as well as the importance of the energy and environmental targets and objectives that they can effect.

Two examples of organizational charts are given in Figure 5.2 and Figure 5.3. These examples illustrate that each company defines its organizational structure in its own way - the one that is most

Management ' team '

Project manager

Management

EEMS leader

team

Name, LastName Name, LastName Name, LastName Name, LastName Name, LastName

Name, LastName

Name, LastName Name, LastName Name, LastName Name, LastName Name, LastName

Name, LastName

Leader area

-| ECC1 CASTING -| ECC2 PASTING

-| ECC7 INJECTION

GRID

CO

C2)

Name, LastName

LEAD PARTS

00

©

Name, LastName

PLATE

CO

(2)

Name, LastName

OXIDE

CO

(2)

Name, LastName

DRYING

CO

C2)

Name, LastName

FORMATION

CO

C2)

Name, LastName

FORMATION

CO

(?)

Name, LastName

DRYING

CD

C2-)

Name, LastName

CHARGE

CT)

(2)

Name, LastName

TRACTION

CT)

(2)

Name, LastName

MANUAL

CT)

(2)

Name, LastName

CCS

CO

C2)

Name, LastName

MCB

CO

C2)

Name, LastName

INJECTION

CO

(2)

Name, LastName

SLA

© ©

Name, LastName

MT

© ©

Name, LastName

PD

CO

C2)

Name, LastName

OFFICE

©

©

Name, LastName

MT/QA/UC

CO

©

Name, LastName

A&M

CO

©

Name, LastName

Secretary

©

Name, LastName

Prepared by:

Approved by:

2/10/2005

Sub-leader

Member

Figure 5.2 EEMS Organization Scheme at a Battery Manufacturer

Energy technical advisor Name, LastName

Eng. Manager

G/S LEADER Name, LastName g/S Sect. Manager

SUB LEADER

G/S Supevisor

Assistant team

Assistant team

Name, LastName

TP Sec. Manager

SS/P LEADER Name, LastName ss/p Asst. Manas.

ENG. LEADER Name, LastName

Eng. Manager

HEAD OFFICE

Name, LastName

P/A Manager

SUB LEADER

TP Sect. Chief

SUB LEADER

SUB LEADER

Eng. Foreman

OFFICE+QC

-►

SUB LEADER

-

Name, LastName

Name, LastName

QC Sect. Chief

QC

SUB LEADER

G/A Sect. Chief

SUPPORT TEAM

All Foreman /

Operator

Monitoring / Management Item

• Starch raw materials

• Final product

• Electrical consumption

• Steam consumption

• Water consumption

SUPPORT TEAM

All Foreman / Operator

Monitoring / Management Item

► Sorbital raw materials »Final product »Electrical consumption Water consumption

SUPPORT TEAM

All Foreman /

Operator

Monitoring / Management Item

Sugar raw materials TP product raw mat. Final product Electrical consump. Water consump.

SUPPORT TEAM

All Foreman /

Operator

Monitoring / Management Item

• Electrical installations

• Cooling tower

• Air consumption

Monitoring / Management Item

Electrical consumption Raw water consumption

Monitoring / Management Item

Electrical consumption Raw water consumption

TP LEADER

Figure 5.3 EEMS Organization Scheme at a Chemicals Manufacturer familiar to the workforce. The format itself is not important. The important point is that the employees can identify clearly their own role and responsibilities for the implementation of the EEMS in their company.

The key roles that affect energy and environmental performance should be included in the employee's job description, where possible, and could be included in the employee's performance evaluation. These roles and responsibilities may be documented by human resources in a consistent format that includes the person's name, title, organizational responsibilities, key energy and environmental tasks, authority, and interrelation with other key tasks and other personnel.

5.4 Implementation Plan

After all of the preparatory and planning activities have been executed, implementation follows. Even the best designed EEMS is worthless unless it is integrated efficiently and effectively into the organization's routine activities, and is fully accepted and supported by those who should make it work. Therefore, an implementation action plan needs to be prepared that will contain the detailed steps to accomplish specified objectives and which will show what is to be done, by whom, by when, inclusive of the key events or milestones appropriate for progress reporting (Fig. 5.4). The example plan in Figure 5.4 outlines the introducing EEEMS

1. Energy and environmental policy & organization

1.1 Top management workshop to define energy and environmental strategies

1.2 Officially declare and display company Energy and Environmental policy

1.3 Set-up EEMS organization

1.4 Designate Energy Cost Centers (ECC)

2. Assign responsibility a.1 Energy and environment manager a.a EEMS Management Team Members a.3 EEMS Team Members Operation a.4 ECC Team Leaders a.B ECC - Performance Improvement Teams a.6 Awareness & Motivation (A&M) Coordinator

3. Training and communication

3.1 ECC Leaders Workshop

3.a A&M Introduction to staff

3.3 Awarenes & Motivation Activities

3.3.1 Rewards/Incentive announcement

3.3.a Notice board

3.3.3 Performance Improvement Opportunities

4. Technical Workshops for ECC Teams

4.1 Review Operation procedures for major processes

4.a Review Operation procedures for major utilities

4.3 Set up EEMS operation procedure by ECCs

4.4 Formation of standardized operational procedures

4.B Management review

5. Preparation for performance measurement

B.1 Confirm sources of energy, environmental and production data

B.a Define performance indicators

B.3 Establish data handling procedures

5.4 Update current situation of factory and position to installed additional meters

B.B.1 Single line diagrams

B.5.2 NG piping, Water piping, C/A piping

5.5 installation of meters

5.4.1 Specifications of submeters and data acquisition system

5A2 Invite proposals and select contractors

B.4.3 Installation and start-up

6. Start operation of EEMS and collection of pilot data

6.1 EEMS operation - regular data collection and verification

6.a ECC teams meetings for data interpretation

6.3 Set up initial targets for ECCs

6.4 Identify performance improvement opportunities

6.B Regular reporting on actions and results

6.6 Reset initial targets if neccesary

6.7 Performance improvement verfication by CUSUM method

7. Management policy review meetings

7.1 Supporting continuous performance improvements initiative

7.a Developing standardized procedures for best practice operation

Duration

94 wks

4 wks a wks a wks

3 wks

1 wk

1 wk

1 wk

18 wks

4 wks

4 wks

4 wks

4 wks a wks

4G wks

8 wks

3 wks

4 wks

5 wks a wks

B wks

2G wks

8 wks

8 wks

4 wks

28 wks a8 wks a8 wks

B wks

B wks a8 wks

B wks a8 wks

16 wks

16 wks

16 wks

Task Name

Duration

94 wks

8 wks a wks

a wks a wks a wks

1a a wks a wks

4 wks a wks a wks

3 wks

1 wk

1 wk

1 wk

18 wks

4 wks

4 wks

4 wks

4 wks a wks

4G wks

8 wks

3 wks

4 wks

5 wks a wks

B wks

2G wks

8 wks

8 wks

4 wks

28 wks a8 wks

a8 wks

B wks

B wks a8 wks

B wks a8 wks

16 wks

16 wks

16 wks

Figure 5.4 Sample EEMS Implementation Plan generic activities for EEMS implementation. Any company embarking on the implementation of EEMS will need to produce a customized version of that plan, reflecting the tasks, milestones and responsibilities specific for their own circumstances.

The first step in implementation should be to present EEMS policies, procedures, responsibilities and individual work instructions to the staff through training sessions. Training should highlight the individual requirements under the EEMS. Since the implementation process may require a significant portion of organizational resources for a prolonged period of time, it may be best to have the management team oversee this phase in larger organizations.

5.4.1 Initiate Awareness and Training Programs 5.4.1.1 Awareness and Motivation

In order to facilitate the effective implementation of EEMS, it is essential to have the full and wholehearted cooperation of the workforce. This is the main objective of awareness program. The employees must understand what is happening and not feel threatened by it. Everyone involved in implementation should understand what EEMS is intended to achieve and how it should be operated. Everybody should be motivated to make the best possible use of it. This ideal state of affairs can only be approached if the awareness and motivation (A&M) process starts at the beginning of EEMS implementation. For large organizations that employ thousands of people, the A&M activities will require dedicated action plan. A sample action plan is provided in Figure 5.5.

The principal message to all staff involved in the EEMS project should be that the project is intended to make them more effective in their jobs and facilitate the execution of their duties. At the same time, the

Activities Month

1

e

7 . 9

1G

11

12

Status

Officially declare company energy policy

x

One-off Continue

Display energy policy statement

x

1^1 One-off Continue

ECC leaders workshop on A&M

x

1^1 One-off Continue

Rewards/incentive announcement

x

S*] One-off 1—1 Continue

Awareneww & Motivation (A&M) training to all staff

x

x

x

x

1^1 One-off Continue

Assign A&M action group

x

One-off 1—1 Continue

Notice board

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

l~~l One-off y Continue

Energy conservarion opportunities suggested by staff

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

1 1 One-off Continue

Energy saving slogan contest

x

1^1 One-off Continue

Newsletter

x

x

x

rj One-off Continue

Energy exhibition

x

One-off ^□Continue j

Figure 5.5 Sample Action Plan for A&M Activities

Figure 5.5 Sample Action Plan for A&M Activities project will reduce the operating costs of the organization and so help secure the long-term employment prospects of entire staff.

The most significant problem in achieving changes in the individual attitude towards energy and environmental issues is the need to change long standing, deep-seated customs and practices that regard energy and environment as marginal and as vague issues of no concern to individual workers. In attempting to change these attitudes, the aim is to make energy and environmental performance improvement an integral part of the routine practice of the organization by making everyone aware of the needs and ways how to improve performance at their own place of work.

With small to medium size enterprises, having several hundreds of employees, this is a moderately difficult task. However, in large companies with several thousands of employees and working three shifts a day this is a real challenge! Since everybody should feel included and affected by the ongoing EEMS program, the problem is how to reach them all over a reasonable period of time.

An effective approach could be by 'train-the-trainers' first, and then spreading well planned A&M activities throughout a factory (Fig. 5.5). The staff best positioned to become trainers are ECC leaders. They are already assigned the responsibility for performance in their own areas, where they need to work with other staff members in order to achieve results. Therefore, besides the technical training that they are undergoing anyway, they should be also trained for A&M activities in order to mobilize the entire workforce for EEMS project. Box 5.5 suggests an agenda for such training.

Box 5.5: Train-The-Trainer Workshop for A&M Introduction to All Staff

Participants: ECC Leaders/A&M Coordinator

Objectives:

• To provide participants with an overview of the 'Awareness and Motivation Introduction for All Staff' course

• To provide participants with an understanding of important factors for developing awareness and motivation

• To encourage participants to identify specific A&M activities in their own area of responsibility

Duration: 1 day

Training Topics:

• Content of 'Awareness & Motivation introduction for EMS Staff'

• Important factors for development Awareness and Motivation

• Adult Learning

• Techniques and Activities for training

• Support Activities to Create Awareness and Motivation

• Basic communication skills

EEMS implementation will only be effective if those who need to act have been motivated to become involved. The efforts and performance of individual employees should relate directly to the energy and environmental performance in the area of their operational responsibilities. Training should promote this awareness.

The individuals should also have the time required to actually perform tasks that they have been assigned relating to the EEMS. Performance should be acknowledged and rewarded. During implementation, both top management and operational team members play crucial roles. Since implementation on the shop floor requires constant attention, the ECC team leaders must be relied upon to supply that effort, support and motivation.

The EEMS project must be visible all over the factory. Notice boards can be used to update information on EEMS activities and indeed on the results when achieved (Box 5.6).

Box 5.6: Notice Board

Objective: to use as a medium to update monthly energy and environmental information to all staff Responsible person: A&M coordinator Location: at each ECC Content:

• monthly energy, raw material and water consumption charts, and environmental compliance data

• update energy and environmental management information

• energy and environmental activities of the month

Another communication channel can be the company's regular newsletter, or a special supplement on EEMS (Box 5.7).

Box 5.7: Newsletter Objective:

1. To use as a medium to communicate and update information and results on energy and environmental management program to all staff.

2. To use a sa medium for all staff to communicate their opinions, comments or ideas to the othesr and to the management.

Responsible person: A&M coordinator or newsletter editor team Date to be issued: every three months

Distribution: Distribute to all departments and all rest areas.

Content:

• Message from management

• Summary of energy and environmental performance over the last three months and costs saving results

• Energy and environmental tips and useful knowledge

• Question and answer column (to clarify any questions that staff may have on energy and environmental management)

• Interviews with people who take part in EEMS activities

• Games/puzzles/cartoons concerning energy and environment

• Ideas/suggestion/comments from readers

At the beginning of the EEMS implementation, the A&M activities may include some promotional events like an EEMS slogan contest, energy and environmental exhibition, screening of relevant films, etc.

However intensive A&M activities are there will always be some resistance to change. Therefore, A&M activities must be carefully planned (Fig. 5.5) to extend over the period of EEMS introduction, implementation and operation, until such time as EESM is fully integrated into the company's daily routines.

5.4.1.2 Training

While A&M activities address the entire workforce, aiming to inform them on and mobilize them for EEMS implementation, training is planned for technical personnel that will be involved with the procedural aspects of EEMS implementation. Box 5.8 suggests an agenda for the on-the-job training of technical staff members responsible for operating EEMS within the company.

Box 5.8: Training for EE Managers and ECC Leaders on EEMS operations

OBJECTIVES:

This training should upgrade the skills of the staff to operate the energy and environmental management system on a continuous basis.

METHOD:

Training will consist of presentations, practical assignments, specific tasks at the factory, review, analysis and report preparation, on the job, or outside the factory if required.

DURATION:

1-2 weeks

SCOPE Task 1

Introduction to EEMS procedures and equipment Clarify Energy Cost Centers ( ECCs) Performance Indicators (PI) description

Clarify single line diagrams for installation of additional meters: Electrical - check single line diagram and positions to install kWh meters Water - check water piping and position to install water flow meters Natural gas (NG) - check NG piping and position to install NGflow meters Compressed air (CA) - check compressed air piping and position to install CAflow meter s Steam - check steam piping and position to install steam meters

Production control process - check production control method and records keeping Task 2

Preparation for EEMS pilot operation

Check utility and maintenance logs and production records of each ECC Set data handling procedures and forms for each ECC,

Task 3

Pilot data collection and analysis for all ECCs Task 4

Setting targets for individual ECC Task 5

Proposing corrective actions and report making

The purpose of training employees in this area is clear enough. It is to ensure that they have the appropriate knowledge and skills to carry out daily performance monitoring activities and to identify the energy and environmental performance improvement opportunities that exist around them.

To support a proactive attitude of the workforce toward proposing performance improvement opportunities (PIO), the ECC leaders should be trained to describe such opportunities in an appropriate format that will facilitate consideration and approval of proposals. Box 5.9 suggests a format that ties together all the relevant aspects of a particular performance improvement measure.

The newly learned skills and knowledge should be periodically reinforced as the results start to show, by structured 'review workshops' attended by ECC leaders, EE manager(s), operational and top management teams.

Box 5.9: PIO 1: Automatic Turning ON/OFF of Injection Molding Machine

Purpose: Save electricity used by the cylinder for the injection-molding machine and build and dissipate awareness of energy minimization

Overview: Improvement measures are to be implemented in order to reduce energy loss based on a new concept that the cylinder heater is automatically switched off using a timer.

Target:

i Electricity

■ Production equipment

During operating time

Non-production equipment

■ During non-operating time (lunch break, between shifts)

Description:

Current status

Improvement measure

Temperature Electricity

Temperature

Electricity

Production Non-production Production 1715 2030

Heater

Temperature

Electricity

Heater

Production

Production

Non-production

up

T7:T5 2O:3O

ON

OFF

ON

Timer forced to turn off at 17:15

Timer forced to turn off at 10:30

Timer forced to turn off at 17:15

Timer forced to turn off at 10:30

> switching off the heater is forgotten when production is complete for the day a timer circuit is to be designed so that it automatically turns off at the end of production as well as automatically turn on (unlike the traditional timer circuit that considers the temperature rise time only). This is a fool-proof measure to keep the heater off during breaks

For overtime work, the switch-off circuit is to be temporarily reset when the overtime button is pressed

Energy consumption before improvement

5640 kWh/year

Energy consumption after improvement

4794 kWh/year

Reduced energy amount

846 kWh/year

Reduction of CO2

4T9 t /year

(effect by horizontal application: 846 ■ 40

lines = 33 840 kWh/ year)

(effect by horizontal application: 16 760 t/year

Environmental improve ments

Investment costs

Cost savings

Approved by: .

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment