Naturally Occurring Ozone Destroying Catalysts

Natural catalysts have probably always been part of the atmospheric system, and many—such as hydrogen, nitrogen and chlorine oxides—are similar to those now being added to the atmosphere by human activities. The main difference is in production and accumulation. The natural catalysts tend to be produced in smaller quantities and remain in the atmosphere for a

Figure 6.1 Schematic representation of the formation of stratospheric ozone

Figure 6.1 Schematic representation of the formation of stratospheric ozone

Ho2 Perhydroxyl Radikal

shorter time than their anthropogenic hydrogen, the hydroxyl radical (OH) and the counterparts. perhydroxyl radical (HO 2)—all derived from water vapour (H2O), methane (CH4) and Hydrogen oxides molecular hydrogen (H2), which occur naturally in the stratosphere. They are referred to Hydrogen oxides (HOx) include atomic collectively as odd hydrogen particles (Crutzen

Figure 6.2 Diagrammatic representation of the sources of natural and anthropogenic ozone-destroyers

Figure 6.2 Diagrammatic representation of the sources of natural and anthropogenic ozone-destroyers

Naturally Occurring Ozone

1972), and, although relatively low in total volume, they affect ozone strongly, particularly above 40km. Hammond and Maugh (1974) have estimated that the HOX group, through its catalytic properties, is responsible for about 11 per cent of the natural destruction of ozone in the stratosphere (see Figure 6.3). The odd hydrogens lose their catalytic capabilities when they are converted to water vapour.

The Basic Survival Guide

The Basic Survival Guide

Disasters: Why No ones Really 100 Safe. This is common knowledgethat disaster is everywhere. Its in the streets, its inside your campuses, and it can even be found inside your home. The question is not whether we are safe because no one is really THAT secure anymore but whether we can do something to lessen the odds of ever becoming a victim.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment