EPAs estimates of the average adults daily exposure to dioxins from dietary intake

[Picograms per day]

Dietary exposure

Dietary

Total dietary

to CDDs

exposure

exposure

Food type

and CDFs

to PCBs

to dioxins

Beef

9.0

4.2

13.2

Freshwater fish and

shellfish

5.9

7.1

13.0

Dairy products (cheese,

yogurt, etc.)

6.6

3.2

9.8

Other meats (lamb,

baloney, etc.)

4.5

1.0

5.5

Marine fish and shellfish

2.5

2.4

4.9

Milk

3.2

1.5

4.7

Pork

4.2

0.2

4.4

Poultry

2.4

0.9

3.3

Eggs

1.4

1.7

3.1

Vegetable fat (oils,

margarine, etc.)

1.0

0.6

1.6

Total

40.7

22.8

63.5

Note: The average adult is assumed to weigh 70 kilograms (154 pounds). A picogram is one-trillionth of a gram.

CDDs=Chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins

CDFs=Chlorinated dibenzofurans

PCBs = Polychlorinated biphenyls source: "Table 1. EPA's Estimates of the Average U.S. Adult's Daily Exposure to Dioxins from Dietary Intake, Picograms per Day," in Information on EPA's Draft Reassessment of Dioxins, GA0-02-515, U.S. General Accounting Office, Washington, DC, April 2002

beef. New labels containing food handling instructions were required on consumer packages of raw meats and poultry.

In 1996 more illnesses were attributed to E. coli, this time in unpasteurized apple juice. The FDA proposed new regulations to improve the safety of fresh and processed juices. In that same year several federal and state agencies established a surveillance program called Food-Net to monitor laboratory-identified foodborne diseases related to seven pathogens in parts of five states. By 2004 the program had grown to monitor nine pathogens and syndromes in ten states, encompassing 44.1 million people (15% of the U.S. population). Preliminary FoodNet data for 2004 were published in 2005 and are presented in Table 10.3.

FoodNet identified 15,806 cases of foodborne illnesses related to monitored pathogens in 2004. Salmonella accounted for 41% of cases, followed by Campylo-bacter (36%) and Shigella (14%).

The incidence of diseases attributed to Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, STEC 0157, Listeria, S. Typhimurium, and Yersinia decreased dramatically between 1996 and 2004. The CDC attributes the decline to several factors, including increased public awareness about foodborne diseases and food safety, new pathogen reduction measures

TABLE 10.3

Project Earth Conservation

Project Earth Conservation

Get All The Support And Guidance You Need To Be A Success At Helping Save The Earth. This Book Is One Of The Most Valuable Resources In The World When It Comes To How To Recycle to Create a Better Future for Our Children.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment