Endnotes

The firsthand observations and direct quotations in this chapter are by and large based on the author's 6-week visit to China in the winter of 1996 to 1997. For a more detailed account of this journey, and the related environmental questions examined, as well as the documentary sources for other factual points made in this chapter, please see the author's book Earth Odyssey Around the World in Search of Our Environmental Future (New York Broadway Books, 1999). Additional research and reporting...

Jim Motavalli

The Indian coastal city of Mumbai, formerly Bombay, is home to India's vibrant film industry (Bollywood) and probably boasts more cell phones per capita than any other city on the subcontinent. But it is also home to one of Asia's largest slums. Half of Mumbai's population lacks running water or electricity, and the smoke from hundreds of thousands of open cooking fires joins with the sooty smoke from two-stroke auto rickshaws, belching taxis, diesel buses, and coal-fired power plants in a...

Shifting Sand

With no access to the municipal beach and no parking even if there was, Unger sits in his van and points to the surf as it crashes on the beach. We've already lost 30 feet of beach since they replenished this stretch a few years ago. It's something that we'll have to keep doing, and it's galling that for the most part it benefits only a few wealthy property owners. But dire predictions that all the replenished sand would be washed out to sea within 2 or 3 years have not yet been borne out. It's...

Sinking Fiji

From Sydney, I catch a flight to Nadi on Fiji's main island of Viti Levu. There I catch a second cross-island flight aboard a Twin-Otter prop plane. There are six of us taking the night flight, including two ladies in saris, as we fly over mountaintop clouds illuminated by star-spangled southern constellations. In 1874, the kingdom of Fiji, known for its fierce cannibal warriors, became a British Crown colony. The following year a measles epidemic killed a quarter of the native Fijians....

Their Hands Are Tied

Inside the Ministry of Planning in the Antiguan capital of St. John's, Daven Joseph leans across his desk and talks of the need to train our people in coastal zone management and development. Removal of beach sand has been restricted but, he adds, It is not enforced properly because we don't have the capacity to patrol the beaches. There has been, he admits, no effort to replant mangroves, but I think that can be one of the more significant programs. At another cramped office not far from the...

Of Climate Change

With contributions from Sally Deneen, Ross Gelbspan, David Helvarg, Mark Hertsgaard, Orna Izakson, Kieran Mulvaney, Dick Russell, and Colin Woodard Published in 2004 by Routledge 29 West 35th Street New York, NY 10001 www.routledge-ny.com Published in Great Britain by Routledge 11 New Fetter Lane London EC4P 4EE www.routledge.co.uk Copyright 2004 by E The Environmental Magazine Routledge is an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group. This edition published in the Taylor & Francis e-Library,...

Australias Coral Crisis

I did not see some of the worst bleaching effects in the Keys, but 8 months later I get an opportunity to investigate coral bleaching and its links to climate change as part of a magazine assignment in Australia and Fiji. It will turn out to be a challenging job full of too much travel, miscommunications, political conflict, a dive in which my air cuts off, and another in which I cut my hand on coral, resulting in the need for hand surgery. Still, given my paradise-rich itinerary, I receive...

Colin Woodard

When the Dutch want to spend a summer's day by the sea, not a few drive up to the quiet village of Petten, perched on Holland's North Sea coast. Some stay in tidy cottages huddled within earshot of the roaring surf others smell the sea air or watch seabirds from their hotel balconies or the windows of the handful of shops and restaurants near the hamlet's main intersection. But from town, nobody can get so much as a glimpse of the nearby sea. As far as the eye can see, Petten's ocean view is...

Whither the Wild Salmon

As bad as this less-snow more-rain trend may be for people, it already poses problems for a beloved regional symbol wild salmon. Climate change, according to a report by Canada's David Suzuki Foundation, is seen as one of the causes of a dramatic drop in Pacific salmon populations along the west coast of North America. Kim Hyatt speaks matter-of-factly. For more than 25 years, he has made it his life's work to understand the sockeye salmon of Canada's Pacific region, particularly the Okanagan...

Author Biographies

Sherry Barnes currently lives on Galankin Island near Sitka, Alaska. A graduate of Prescott College in Arizona and a former intern for E The Environmental Magazine, she has produced radio series for National Public Radio in Alaska, and is currently working at a faculty support center for the University of Alaska Southeast. Gary Braasch is a nature photo journalist who covers environmental issues for magazines worldwide. He was named Outstanding Nature Photographer in 2003 by the North American...

Barbuda Half an Island

The isle of Barbuda is 27 miles north of Antigua. There is evidence the two were joined in recent geological times, but today in some ways Barbuda could be on a different planet. Although about two-thirds the size of its sister island, Barbuda has a mere fourteen hundred inhabitants, most of whom live in the town of Codrington. The town is named after Christopher Codrington, a colonial governor of the Leewards who once signed a 200-year lease with the British government for Barbuda with the...

Dick Russell

Antigua is too beautiful. Sometimes the beauty of it seems unreal. Sometimes the beauty of it seems as if it were stage sets for a play, for no real sunset could look like that no real seawater could strike that many shades of blue at once. . . . No real sand on any real shore is that fine or that white in some places or that pink in other places . . . . Fifteen years after those words were written, I am standing on the shoreline at Runaway Bay. It is mid-January, the...

David Helvarg

Rik Clay Red Ice Radio

Puking penguins and global warming may not, on first blush, appear to have much in common. But as I discovered in Antarctica, scientific evidence is often where you find it. Torgersen Island, Antarctica, with its thousands of squawking, flipper-flapping, chick-pecking penguins, combines the pungent odor of a cow-barn with the sound levels of a hip-hop concert. Plus most of the birds here, parents and chicks alike, have managed to stain themselves the color of Georgia red clay with their...

Kieran Mulvaney

We squint through the fog, trying to make out the shape we know we should be able to see by now. The charts say it is there, and the radar shows it clearly, but to our eyes there still is no sign of the island that lies just 2 miles ahead. Then, slowly, the mist parts, and our blindness gives way to incredulity. It seems almost impossibly barren, a boulder-strewn piece of rock in the middle of freezing, gray ocean, with a ramshackle collection of huts and houses standing defiantly at its base....

China The Cost of Coal Mark Hertsgaard

My first morning in China, I was unexpectedly stricken with a fear known to all working journalists Did I come all this way in search of a nonexistent story Back in the United States, I had heard over and over again that China had the worst air pollution in the world, thanks to its overwhelming reliance on coal to fuel an economy that, throughout the 1990s, was growing by an average of 8 percent a year. All this coal burning was not only fouling China's skies, I'd been told, it had also made...

The Mangroves Are Gone

The ideal vantage point for exploring what is happening to Antigua is from the sea. On a Friday morning, along with a half dozen other visitors, I embarked on Eli's Eco Tour, a day-long voyage around the island from the Caribbean Sea on the west side to the Atlantic Ocean on the east. It is skippered by 30-year-old Eli Fuller on his 34-foot, center-console motorboat, the Isis. Fuller was born and raised on Antigua. His grandfather, who arrived in 1941 as America's vice-consul, stayed on to open...