The David Wilson Millennium Eco House

A demonstration Eco-House has been built in the grounds of the School of the Built Environment, University of Nottingham (Figure 8.3). It is designed as a research facility and a flexible platform for the range of systems appropriate to housing. Its features are:

• PV tiles integrated into conventional slates providing 1250 kWh/year;

• solar collectors of the vacuum tube type on the south elevation to meet the demand for domestic hot water;

• light pipe illuminating an internal bathroom and providing natural ventilation;

Natural Ventilation During Winter

Figure 8.2

• solar chimney to provide buoyancy ventilation in summer and passive Hockerton overall life-style warmth in winter; specification

• helical wind turbine;

ground source heat pump to supplement space heating.

Figure 8.2

• solar chimney to provide buoyancy ventilation in summer and passive Hockerton overall life-style warmth in winter; specification

• helical wind turbine;

• ground source heat pump to supplement space heating.

The output from the energy systems is constantly monitored.

Associated with the Eco-House are several free-standing sun-tracking PV panels tilted to the optimum angle.

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable. The usage of renewable energy sources is very important when considering the sustainability of the existing energy usage of the world. While there is currently an abundance of non-renewable energy sources, such as nuclear fuels, these energy sources are depleting. In addition to being a non-renewable supply, the non-renewable energy sources release emissions into the air, which has an adverse effect on the environment.

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